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Thread: False Emotion Disorder **STRONG AB/SU Triggers**

  1. #1

    False Emotion Disorder **STRONG AB/SU Triggers**

    I have suffered from depression for most of my life. Mostly just thinking too much, but the thinking stopping a lot of things in life. I am normally an easy-going person without a worry but when I get alone my thoughts change. After being ruled 'sane' by a psychiatrist (or two or three) and anti-depressants having zero effect (Effexor and Prozac - one year each), I started wondering if it isn't mental, what is it? And this is what I have come up with. I hope it helps you as much as it does me.

    "A false emotion is an unexplainable mood caused by your brain being confused about what your face is making it think you're going through now."

    I believe we're looking for complicated solutions for behavioural issues to what is a simple problem.

    A slogan of depression groups is Depression Hurts saying that depression is as much pain just like physical pain is. I think the slogan should be Hurt Depresses. You just don't recognize it as that. The feelings are a symptom of healing from the pain caused to the exertion to your face which is simulating an emotion/feeling.

    The most obvious example of a false emotion would be trying to open an impossible jar, and the rage you get in your face. You arenít really madder at this jar than anything else in life. The physical stress from trying to open the jar ends up in your face causing a feeling of rage.

    We have probably all heard the saying 'If you keep making that face, it's going to freeze like that.'. I think that's what happens. You stress/work out your face, and it starts to affect you a couple of days later. Your face is muscles Ė you can overwork them.

    The nerve endings in your face each have a profile and your brain knows the patterns of pain or pressure for each feeling. The more pain cells activated/hurt and the intensity of the pain/pressure, the stronger the feeling.

    Once you start getting a feeling in your face when itís healing, your brain tries to figure out why you feel angry/worried/sad and if there's no obvious reason to focus on, rummages through the past trying to find what might be causing the problem to fix it, like it thinks that if it can solve it, the feeling will just disappear, and it's just bringing up things that support it because it's not going to fix it because it's a physical problem and not mental.

    Iíve never taken ergonomics seriously. I now think that I have just barely survived chairs.

    My issues started in Grade 7 when I started at a school where you moved to different classes each period. Sitting at the front on a stool, to the right on a stackable chair, at the back in the chair attached to the desk. That's when I started getting angry in life. The headaches. The out of character behaviour. I attempted suicide in December of that year, at 11 years of age.

    For me, itís chairs. Iíve worked in offices and on computers for 40 years. It could be anything doing it to you. But, chairs arenít as obvious since they arenít physically tiring. And since itís an accumulation of stress or time-delayed, you might not even be aware itís doing it to you. I have said many times in my life, ĎIt canít be that. I always do that.í. But never for this many days, now.

    I would categorize false emotions into four different types:

    Instant: The face drop from being tired, bugaboos and disappointment. This is where your out of character and over-reactions would come from, if elevated false emotion levels are present.

    After-Shock: The moody day from over-stressing your face and a couple of days later feeling the effects of that, and not relating it to being the result of something that had no obvious consequence to you, at the time.

    Accumulated/Chronic: The accumulation over time where an activity has physically stressed you out at a low level, and it builds up over time and takes time to get rid of it. The dark periods.

    Physical Pressure: From physical pressure put on the face either through bloating, wind, perfume/scents. Whatever pressures or fills the face.

    False emotions do not feed you any good resolved memories and only what might be causing whatever youíre feeling.

    Your brain will present any ongoing issues happening in your life and if none are obvious starts presenting you with what has resolved badly at the anger/worry/sad level that you are experiencing.

    I believe this theory explains roid rage, post-partum depression, obsession and other behavioural issues.

    What we all need to understand is that our brains are just trying to help us solve physical problems it thinks are mental problems it should be handling, while the presented solutions are just fuelling them for real, in the process.
    Last edited by Suzi; 09-02-19 at 01:28 PM. Reason: Adding trigger warnings as per DWD standard practise.

  2. #2
    Boss Lady ;) Suzi's Avatar
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    Hi and welcome to DWD.

    Whilst I think I see where you are coming from, it's not something that I think is applicable for everyone.
    I don't think for one second that being seen by mental health professionals or taking medication for mental health makes you less than "sane." Is it only those two medications you have taken? There are so many different types, you may have found another one or a combination which helps better? Do you have a support network around you?

    As someone who has had post natal depression, I don't think it was linked at all to my face feeling overwhelmed, and I have nursed my husband through several breakdowns, severe depression and panic attacks so bad that he couldn't leave the house - again, I don't think it was led by his face either..

    However much I disagree with your opinion, I'm not muting you and your thoughts as we all have different ways of dealing with our own mental health.
    Do a little of something that makes you happy every day!


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    Jaquaia (09-02-19)

  4. #3
    Thanks for putting up my post. As one psychiatrist put it, 'You have absolutely no mental issues. None that I can treat. If there is something wrong with you, you are doing it to yourself.'. I have been on a couple of other medications. They just don't help. No effect starting them, and I quit both the Effexor (highest dosage) and Prozac (2nd highest dosage) cold turkey after a year and nothing. I can't remember the other ones.

    This theory would be more for the people who are sitting there thinking about something like what someone said to them at work 30 years ago. Where you are constantly thinking about issues that have no relevance, anymore, other than they just keep popping into your head making you mad, again, and again, and again. It wouldn't apply to people suffering the real depression of a tragedy or loss.

    As for a support network, never heard of it. (LOL) It's hard to get support when you're the happiest person people know. When I'm engaged with them.

    Thanks, I'll be interested to see what anyone else thinks of it.

    I hope your husband is doing better. And you as well.

  5. #4
    Guardian of the North and kipper holder Angie's Avatar
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    Ok depression does not need a reason it happens for many different reasons or sometimes for no reason that can be found, my issues from years ago are the reasons for my depression also ptsd and anxiety and what people say to others can have a lasting effect on people either positively or negatively.
    If you canít fly, then run, if you canít run, then walk, if you canít walk, then crawl, but by all means keep moving.
    Quote by Martin Luther King JR

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  7. #5
    Princess Sparkles Paula's Avatar
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    Hi and welcome. I have a question, if you are the happiest person people know, and I assume therefore have positive facial expressions in general, how is it your face affecting your mood?

    I have to say I found your ideas difficult to stomach. I am by nature a positive, optimistic person and donít go around with an angry/worried/sad face (even when Iím struggling - youíd never know Iím ill from my expressions most of the time). I find it difficult to believe that my 3 decades of illness is caused by me having a sad face all that time. Mental health is far more complicated than that and our brains are immensely intricate - we know so little about them - so your theory is over simplistic and doesnít pay any respect by the wonderful complexity of the human body and mind
    The purpose of life is not to be happy. It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well.

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  9. #6
    Librarian and chief holder of antiquities and biscuits Jaquaia's Avatar
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    I completely disagree with you. Especially with this part;

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Willidau View Post
    It wouldn't apply to people suffering the real depression of a tragedy or loss.
    It's attitudes like this that prevent people reaching out for help. Depression IS real, it's not just down to loss or tragedy. There are numerous scientific studies, one in particular discovered that the brain is noticeably different in people with depression than in those without. One study discovered that in 24 women with a history of depression, their hippocampus was between 9% and 13% smaller than those without depression. The more episodes of depression, the smaller their hippocampus got. That's a physical change in the physiology of the brain. Not all of those cases will be down to loss or tragedy. Scientific studies have also shown that there is a genetic link and those who have a family history of depression are more likely to suffer themselves. Depression is medically recognised as a symptom of some illnesses; thyroid disease, autoimmune diseases, vitamin deficiencies to name but a few. There is also beginning to be research into the possibility that depression can be linked to inflammation, a theory postulated by the psychiatrist Edward Bullmore.

    Sometimes people who seem to have their life together and going great can suffer with depression. Considering that as not "real depression" completely negates and diminishes their experiences and could be dangerous if it discourages them from getting help.
    TÍn pŽrdu, jham‚i sŽ rŽcŰbro

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  11. #7
    I am the happiest person people know because I do have positive facial expressions when I am with them. It's when things end or I disengage that the face drops (the switch) and the false emotions come into play.

    I don't know why any idea would be hard to stomach. Sometimes things are as complicated as we make them. Why can't your face hurt as much as your legs from over-exercising it. If depression hurts why can't hurt depress and it being a two-way street? Who's to say the brain isn't flawed. And it is trying to fix physical issues with mental solutions?

    Who's to say there isn't false depression? And who's to say that however you get there it's not going to have the same effect on the brain? I believe I suffer from false depression. It is depression. But it's what is causing mine that I question. All of my thoughts are on my brain all the time. I question what brings them to the forefront at times.
    Last edited by Jaquaia; 09-02-19 at 03:32 PM. Reason: Please try not to double post within minutes

  12. #8
    Librarian and chief holder of antiquities and biscuits Jaquaia's Avatar
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    I tend to believe scientific research that has been thoroughly peer-reviewed and whose results are often replicated by fellow scientists, over random theories with no scientific basis. You're entitled to believe that you have false depression. I believe the science that shows depression is a real, complex and not fully understood illness, casued by a multitude of reasons.
    TÍn pŽrdu, jham‚i sŽ rŽcŰbro

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  14. #9
    Every scientific basis started from a random theory with none, whatsoever. You should be more open-minded. This might help people who are suffering from it and it being another form of depression in one of the multitude of reasons.

  15. #10
    Boss Lady ;) Suzi's Avatar
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    I think that "depression" is very, very different from "feeling a bit blue for a long time"... I wonder if your theory fits more with that, rather than actual depression.
    Actual depression needs help, it is a really real and serious illness that can in some cases end up as fatal. I think that every case should be treated seriously and have far more real help, rather than different variations of "have you tried xyz diet?" or "try smiling more, it'll help" or "try sniffing lavender, it cured my aunties best friends goldfishes friends owner" or "pull yourself together"......

    I'd say that your psych who said...
    As one psychiatrist put it, 'You have absolutely no mental issues. None that I can treat. If there is something wrong with you, you are doing it to yourself.'
    was really brave to have been so sure... I would assume that you would have been experiencing some symptoms which made you head to a psych in the first place? What happened to those symptoms? They got better/went away/weren't there in the first place? I have never met a psych (and I've known quite a few) who would ever put their professional lives on the line like that...

    I've been running DWD for over 11 years and I can honestly say that I've never come across anyone who I could say wasn't experiencing a serious illness.
    Do a little of something that makes you happy every day!


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